Ketamine molecule:

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Ketamine Clinical Trials


Ketamine Infusion for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder


To see complete record on clinicaltrials.gov, please visit this link

Id: NCT01349231

Organisation Name: Yale University

Overal Status: Completed

Start Date: February 2009

Last Update: June 9, 2014

Lead Sponsor: Yale University

Brief Summary: Roughly one-third of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not experience significant clinical benefit from first-line interventions such as pharmacotherapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) or cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Furthermore, OCD patients typically experience the full treatment benefits of first-line interventions only after a time-lag of two to three months. Inadequate symptom relief and delay of symptom relief from first-line treatments are sources of substantial morbidity and decreased quality of life in OCD patients. Converging lines of evidence from neuroimaging, genetic and pharmacological studies support the importance of glutamate abnormalities in the pathogenesis of OCD.

The investigators are conducting an open, uncontrolled study of ketamine in treatment-refractory OCD. Ketamine is a potent antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and has been demonstrated to have rapid anti-depressant effects in patients with Major Depressive Disorder. The investigators have additionally provided evidence for rapid improvement of comorbid OCD and trichotillomania after ketamine infusion in a depressed woman.

Failure of symptom relief and delay of symptom relief from first-line treatments are a source of substantial morbidity and decreased quality of life in OCD patients. Ketamine represents the possibility to provide rapid symptom relief to OCD patients and may provide the mechanism for future drug development to treat OCD more rapidly and effectively.

Conditions:
  • Obsessive-compulsive Disorder


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