Ketamine molecule:

Image from PubChem

Ketamine Clinical Trials


A study to evaluate whether increased codeine levels are seen when both codeine and ketamine are given in small doses to well volunteers.


To see complete record on anzctr.org.au, please visit this link

Id: ACTRN12610000283077

Organisation Name: Flinders University- Department of Clinical Pharmacology

Overal Status: Active, not recruiting

Start Date: 18/11/2009

Brief Summary: Pain from damaged nerves is a common problem particularly in the aged and those with medical problems including diabetes, vascular disease and cancer.A medication called ketamine which is used for anaesthetics is, at much lower doses, also used to help try and control severe chronic nerve pain. In an experiment that has been carried out at Flinders University in the laboratory, it appears that ketamine may increase the effective blood levels of opioid pain killers such as codeine or morphine that are often given in conjunction with ketamine. This study will evaluate whether increased codeine levels are seen when both codeine and ketamine are administered in small doses to well volunteers.Ketamine is already being evaluated in a clinical study by a team led by Flinders University at eight sites across Australia for severe nerve-based pain. This study will be a definitive study on the place of ketamine in the control of chronic, complex pain and should be finished in mid-2010.This study will have huge importance if ketamine is shown to be of clinical benefit. To date, it may well be that the perceived clinical benefit is only because of its effect on increasing the blood levels of strong pain killers.

Countries:
  • Australia
Conditions:
  • The possibility that ketamine,an anaesthetic medication but which is also used at much lower doses, to help try and control severe chronic nerve pain, may increase the effective blood levels of opioids such as codeine or morphine that are often given in conjunction with ketamine.
  • This study is looking at drug metabolism not pain management or anaesthesiology


Total execution time in seconds: 0.086521148681641